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Archive for the ‘Healing Arts Board’ Category

Kris Neuhaus

Kris Neuhaus

Ex-Kansas abortionist Kris Neuhaus wants your pity (she sees herself as a martyr) and your money.

In a radio interview Thursday, she elaborated that she has lost her research job “without explanation” and has initiated a second online “fund me“ campaign to raise $100,000.

Fed by adulation in multiple pro-abortion outlets where she has been termed a “hero-provider,” Neuhaus now insists (as in a press conference in April) that she be referred to as Dr. Neuhaus and bills herself as,

the first woman physician in Kansas to publicly provide abortion care, performing or consulting on over 10,000 procedures.”

Pro-life readers know that she was a failed abortionist who rubberstamped mental health “approvals” for late-term abortions for George Tiller from 1999-2007.

Her medical license was revoked in July 2012, but on appeal, was remanded to the State Board of Healing Arts in March 2014. The Board revoked the license again this January on the narrower complaint of record-keeping failure.

She is now appealing that second revocation.

Neuhaus touts herself as a martyr who lost her medical license unjustly in the pro-life administration of Gov. Sam Brownback due to her “affiliation with Dr. Tiller.”

In actuality, Neuhaus was charged in 2009— during the administration of pro-abortion Gov. Kathleen Sebelius– with violating record-keeping regulations and violating the standard of care for 11 teens obtaining late-term abortions in 2003 at Tiller’s Wichita clinic.

The state Healing Arts Board of Kansas in the past has twice deemed her “a danger to the public” and views her as defiant, self-righteous and “unable to be rehabilitated.”

Neuhaus has promised in the past she will never again do abortions, and claims to have attained a Master’s degree in Public Health at the University of Kansas, so why is she not employable? No answer to that.

In yesterday’s radio interview she said she is seeking public funding to help her afford the filing fees required to apply for medical licenses in other states. (Watchout, America!)

Eighteen months ago, her online campaign raised $63,000 –ostensibly to be used to save her home and pay her legal fees to the Board, at that time billed as $93,000. She has paid nothing to the Board and is protesting the reassessed costs of $31,000 she now owes.

Her husband is running another donation site to repay attorneys for their pro bono work on her behalf.

Neuhaus believes she deserves public support “to enable me to continue to oppose the dire state of women’s health care in Kansas, and to help expose the right-wing’s attempt to export this insanity to other states.”

Defiant and self-righteous seems an understatement.

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Kris Neuhaus

Kris Neuhaus

Remember the Kansas abortionist who over a period of seven years “rubber-stamped” post-viability abortions at the Wichita abortion clinic of the late George Tiller?

Ann Kristin (Kris) Neuhaus is her name and the Kansas Board of Healing Arts is having one heck of a time getting her state license permanently revoked.

This past January, the Board issued a second revocation against Neuhaus. Undaunted, Neuhaus returned to the court that overturned the first revocation. On March 3,

attorneys for Neuhaus petitioned Shawnee County Judge Franklin Theis to block the Board’s second (the new) revocation and dismiss the legal expenses that she had been assessed.

A little history: In April 2010, the Board initiated legal action to revoke the medical license of Neuhaus for failure to provide “standard of care” and professional record-keeping for 11 teens aged 10-18 who had obtained third-trimester abortions from Tiller in 2003.

The role Neuhaus was supposed to play under the law was that of an independent “check” on post-viability abortions by providing bona fide second opinions on maternal health.

At that time, Kansas banned all post-viability abortions except under rare occasions threatening maternal life or substantial and irreversible “harm.” But the legislative intent was blown sky high when a pro-abortion Kansas Attorney General ruled that the “harm” could be “mental.”

Tiller testified under oath about the details of his arrangement with Neuhaus. He said he had called over 100 Kansas physicians but none were willing to do such referrals for him.

Tiller said he was connected to a financially desperate Neuhaus who was willing to provide the legally required mental health referrals using an online “Psych-Lite” diagnostic tool. (Neuhaus was never trained as a psychiatric consultant.)

What actually transpired, however, was that the “independent” referral from Neuhaus came after she interviewed abortion-seekers (almost exclusively from out-of-state) inside Tiller’s clinic just minutes before the procedure was initiated! All this was verified in a Wichita trial record from May 2007.

The Board charged Neuhaus with improperly evaluating those vulnerable girls and breaking state regulations requiring a proper health record for each patient. After extensive hearings by Administrative Law Judge Edward Gashler, the final order of revocation against her license was issued in July 2012 for “professional incompetence” and “failing to meet minimum requirements for maintaining records.”

Neuhaus appealed the order to a pro-abortion district court—that of Judge Theis. In March 2014, Theis overturned the Board’s revocation, concluding it was too “harsh” a penalty for Neuhaus’ atrocious record-keeping. Theis also disagreed with the finding of incompetence and ordered another review by the Board.

This past January, the Board issued

 a second revocation against Neuhaus on the single issue of incomplete medical files for those 11 teens. This was her “third strike” said the Board;

she had been cited in past years for improper patient documentation and had violated her legal stipulation to amend her ways.The Board order characterized her as stubborn and “incapable of successful rehabilitation,” and assessed legal costs at just under $32,000.

But earlier this month Neuhaus petitioned Judge Theis to again block the Board’s revocation and dismiss the legal expenses.

The saga continues.

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Kris Neuhaus

Neuhaus at Board

Late Friday, the Kansas Board of Healing Arts issued a final order of license revocation for abortionist Kris Neuhaus, calling her “incapable of successful rehabilitation.”  Kansans for Life applauds the resolve of the Board in protecting the public from her.

Neuhaus’ license had been revoked in 2012 for her failure to follow both standard of care and record-keeping protocols when providing the legally-required “second  independent medical opinion ” that enabled 11 teens in 2003 to obtain third-trimester abortions at the Wichita abortion clinic of George Tiller.

Neuhaus challenged that revocation in state district court. While upholding the Board’s findings that Neuhaus repeatedly failed to document patient histories properly, Judge Franklin Theis vacated the standard of care charge and sent the matter back to the Board for a “do-over.” on Dec. 11  (see here).

The Board upheld using the sanction of revocation for record-keeping misconduct, because this was Neuhaus’ “third strike ” in this arena.

She had been involved in two prior disciplinary actions from the Board between 1999-2001 and as part of retaining her medical license then, she had legally PROMISED to correct her admitted record-keeping failures in the future.

Creating and maintaining proper medical records is not a trivial matter. The Board asserted that the “the interest of the patient is paramount…Failure to properly document denies the patient of the opportunity to receive proper follow up care and treatment.”

The Board particularly cited the youth, inexperience and vulnerability of the 11 patients, “who may have had a unique need for follow up because [Neuhaus] testified that some exhibited suicidal ideation or other indicators of mental illness or psychiatric problems.”

The Board found that Neuhaus:

  • intentionally, willfully and knowingly committed multiple violations of the Kansas Healing Arts Act;
  • “has not learned from prior disciplinary actions [and] fails to express contrition or otherwise acknowledge the wrongful nature of her conduct”;
  • feels”justified in her actions and showed no signs of remorse”.

Neuhaus’ attorney, Bob Eye, had pressed that Neuhaus had already suffered a sufficient penalty of not having had her Kansas medical license for the past years during litigation. However, the Board disagreed, and cited continued revocation and court costs were warranted under their sanctioning guidelines.

In the earlier revocation, the state lost the $93,000.00 in court costs charged to Neuhaus which Judge Theis dismissed. Neuhaus has fifteen days to file a new appeal.

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Kris Neuhaus

Kris Neuhaus (AP file photo)

Next Thursday, the Kansas State Board of Healing Arts will have a hearing on their 2012 license revocation of abortionist Ann Kristin (Kris) Neuhaus.

They were ordered to review this case (translation: undo the revocation and issue a slap-on-the-wrist penalty) by Shawnee District Court Judge Franklin Theis, ruling on the appeal filed by Neuhaus.

The Board was incensed at the refutation of their authority to revoke, and asked for the state appellate court to intervene, but that support was denied. Instead, they were forced to obey Theis and re-present the case to the Board. In their newest filing,

Board attorneys emphasize this is Neuhaus’ “3rd strike” and her “character is not one that can be rehabilitated.”

The legal issue is Neuhaus’ repeated violations of standard of care, i.e. the baseline professional requirements in assessing the patient, making a diagnosis and committing this data into a written medical file.

The backdrop to the case was that Neuhaus, a failed “circuit-riding” abortionist, had become the integral “rubber stamp” for post-viability abortions performed by infamous (now deceased) Wichita abortionist, George Tiller. The state law at the time banned post-viability abortions without a second opinion from a Kansas- licensed physician verifying that the mother faced “substantial and irreversible” harm. The Board utilized case files obtained by (former) Attorney General Phill Kline of 11 teens who had obtained third trimester abortions in 2003 with Neuhaus’ approval of dire “mental health” conditions.

The Board’s arguments for revocation do not hinge on professional fraud, or the fact that Neuhaus utilized an online ‘psych-profiling’ system to claim grave mental health issues justified those 11 abortions. The Board simply asserts that Neuhaus continues to ignore the essential, legally required written elements for patient intake, evaluation and case history.

It’s a problem that the Board repeatedly disciplined Neuhaus for:

  • in 1999 it was multiple cases of her failure to record drug dispensation as required by the federal authorities (DEA);
  • in 2001, it included her inability to do proper patient intake, create a proper sedation record, or document the gestational age of the unborn child as required by the Kansas Woman’s Right to Know statutes.

Judge Theis himself acknowledged that Neuhaus’ record-keeping fell below standard of care, but it was his opinion that it didn’t merit revocation.

The Board’s newest filing emphasizes that her deficient medical files were particularly egregious at the time of those eleven abortions, because Neuhaus was still bound by her 2001 formal promise to the Board to “comply with all provisions…of medical record-keeping.

The Board’s attorneys profile the situation thusly:

“The Board has attempted to remediate and rehabilitate [Neuhaus] to no avail…by her behavior in the two previous actions [her] conduct shows that she believes her way is better than the Board’s…she was given, not one, but two second chances to fix her documentation issues…her character is not one that can be rehabilitated.”

The Board will be presented with this second airing of the case Thursday and then notify Judge Theis of their stand. It’s assumed that the Board will maintain their original revocation and their authority in this matter.

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Aid for Women closes

KCK’s Aid for Women clinic

As confirmed by the Associated Press today, the Aid for Women (AFW) abortion clinic has closed abruptly, citing the retirement of its abortionist, Ronald Yeomans (age 73), as the reason.

The closure was announced on the AFW website, which was infamous for its churlish remarks undermining Kansas informed consent statutes. AFW’s website dissed state health agency abortion information as forced by “Republican misogynist (women-hating) bullies” and asserted that cancer was a living human organism like the unborn child. (read more here)

AFW was ripe for state oversight. The Kansas clinic licensure and regulation law– long fought for by Kansans for Life– was twice vetoed by past Gov. Kathleen Sebelius before finally being approved by Gov. Sam Brownback in 2011.

AFW applied for– and failed to attain –a state-issued license in June 2011.

This was hours before the new law was blocked in federal court from going into  effect. Aid for Women was quoted they’d “have to gut the place” to be in compliance.

Although the licensure law is stalled in state court, yet to be litigated, AFW did stop provision of abortion pills after the law’s passage.

As has been the case for so many previous Kansas abortionists, Yeomans was trained at the University of Kansas medical school (KUMed) and worked at Planned Parenthood. The Kansas legislature sealed off that sad legacy by ending onsite abortion provision at KUMed in 1997 and onsite abortion training at KUMed in 2013.

AFW abortionists had a long history of malpractice cases and disciplinary actions issued by the Kansas State Healing Arts Board, including original co-owner abortionists Malcolm Knarr and Sherman Zaremski, as well as later staff abortionists, Kris Neuhaus, and Krishna Rajanna.

SORDID HISTORY
Knarr, a convicted drug felon from Oklahoma, opened the business as a Medicaid and abortion facility in the impoverished inner city of Kansas City, Kansas in the early 1980’s. In 1993, KFL orchestrated the citizen petition drive that resulted in a grand jury convened to force government agencies to take action against Knarr.  During this time, he was averaging a malpractice suit every few months.

Although the grand jury was derailed, Knarr was forced out of medicine in 1994, and the state Healing Arts Board has kept him on a permanently suspended license. However, Knarr was able to keep ownership of the clinic with the Board restriction that he not enter any Kansas doctor’s office, hospital or other health-care facility except as a patient or as a visitor of a patient.

Zaremski, a failed lung doctor, joined AFW as Knarr’s business partner and fabricated years of non-existent prescription records. Zaremski performed at least one abortion, if not more, on young sisters who were repeatedly victimized by their step-father (see details here). He took retirement after years of battling licensure penalties and restrictions.

Neuhaus worked for AFW in the mid 1990s, in Kansas City and a Topeka branch. She staged a media event “locking out” Knarr at his own clinic. She then parted company, and worked –and  failed– at two abortion businesses in Lawrence and Wichita. During those years, the Healing Arts Board twice labeled her a “danger to the public” but let her keep her license, enabling her to provide “approval referrals” for late-term abortions at the George Tiller clinic in Wichita. Neuhaus lost her medical license two years ago but is litigating the revocation.

Rajanna was a failed internist who trained at AFW until he left to set up a competing mill down the street—a rat-and-rodent-overrun facility with open syringes of drugs and bags of fetal parts kept in the staff lunchroom refrigerator.  Rajanna lost his license in 2005 (read more here). Five years later, Rajanna caused a media ruckus when he was caught dumping old patient abortion files with personal information into a school dumpster.

SUDDEN CLOSINGS
With abortion rates dropping each year, many abortion businesses across the nation are closing or consolidating. In August 2010, Planned Parenthood of Kansas Mid-Missouri announced the sudden closing of its small Lawrence clinic merely with a note posted on the door, explaining only that continued operation was no longer “financially feasible.”

Yeomans’ Kansas annual medical license renewal was filed and accepted this month by the Healing Arts Board. But that begs the question of why an aging abortionist would pay for a state license if he knew his sole Kansas facility, AFW, was imminently closing?

Yeomans has been an itinerant abortionist for years, for a long time in West Virginia, so he may not have retired from abortions, only at the AFW Kansas City location. The SouthWind abortion clinic appears to need an abortionist—they opened last year in Wichita, Kansas, with three non-Kansas resident abortionists but only one remains on staff. We wouldn’t be surprised to find Yeomans on their roster.

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Hon. Thomas Malone

Hon. Thomas Malone

A rotten district court ruling is too hot to handle and the proper court of review doesn’t want to deal with it. Guess why? The revoked medical licensee is an abortionist.

In a technical legal dodge on Friday, the Kansas Court of Appeals ruled that that it is too early for them to review an appeal by the Kansas State Board of Healing Arts in the matter of abortionist Kris Neuhaus.

The Board revoked her license in July 2012, after a six day hearing under State Administrative Law Judge Edward Gashler in which he found that, “the care and treatment of 11 patients [obtaining late-term abortions in 2003] was seriously jeopardized” by Neuhaus. (More posts here, here, here and here)

But that finding was blocked March 7, 2014 by Shawnee District Court Judge Franklin Theis, opining that the Board ‘over-punished’ Neuhaus for “being sloppy,” taking “short cuts,” and showing “inconsistent attention to proper protocols.”

Days later, the Board appealed. Kansas Court of Appeals chief Judge Thomas Malone issued a 2-page order Friday, claiming Theis’ order did not constitute a “final ruling” that they can review and that the Board had not yet reconsidered sanctions –as ordered by the district court.

The Court of Appeals wants the Board to go away and follow Theis’ order—but that order is exactly what the Board wants the higher court to reverse!

The Board is left with 3 legal options:

  1. ask for reconsideration by the same Court of Appeals that doesn’t want to do so,
  2. ask the state Supreme Court for review of the Court of Appeals position,
  3. go back in session to issue a revised sanction of Neuhaus.

Neuhaus’ lawyers found arguably the best activist judge in the state to take review –Shawnee District Court Judge Franklin Theis. Theis’ sympathies were revealed early on, when the state asked for a bond to recoup further court costs from Neuhaus and Theis said the appeal would proceed without any hope of repayment. He later ruled on the abortionist’s behalf, “there is not sufficient proof to support the board’s findings of ‘professional incompetency’…based on Neuhaus’ failure to maintain adequate records to support the diagnosis.”

NEUHAUS’ LONG-TIME INCOMPETENCE
The inability to do proper patient intake was the subject of disciplinary action against Neuhaus from 1999-2001, when the Board labeled her,“a danger to the public.” Unfortunately, the Board allowed her to keep her license, and she used it to rubber-stamp “mental health” exemption referrals –onsite –for George Tiller, enabling him to proceed with post-viability abortions.

Concerning those notorious referrals, Judge Gashler’s decision upholding the revocation included this:
“There is no indication that the Licensee [Neuhaus] on any occasion actually conversed with a patient concerning the items necessary for a competent mental health examination to be completed… In some cases, the patients were, according to the Licensee’s diagnosis, suicidal. Yet, in not one single case did the Licensee make any recommendations that the patient be seen by a psychiatrist, a psychologist, or any other type of mental health worker. The Licensee simply referred each patient for a pregnancy termination.”

The Kansas Board of Healing Arts needs to keep its new-found resolve to discipline dangerous abortionists, and challenge this new Court of Appeals ruling.

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Past Board director enabled Neuhaus

Past Board director, Larry Buening, enabled Neuhaus

The Kansas State Healing Arts Board voted unanimously Friday evening to appeal the March 7 district court ruling overturning its July 2012 license revocation of former abortionist Ann Kristin (Kris) Neuhaus.

After nine-months’ reflection, Judge Franklin R. Theis issued a very pro-abortion ruling, sending the issue back to the Board for “review,” opining that it was wrong to take away Neuhaus’ license.

Neuhaus does not have a current Kansas license to practice medicine, even in a restricted manner, but this ruling allows her to apply for one—though it is exceedingly doubtful the Board would approve it.

Neuhaus lost her license for repeatedly breaking the state rules on medical record-keeping and patient exams. Specifically, she had issued the required ‘validation’ for third-trimester abortions for 11 young teens in 2003 under the claim that the girls would otherwise suffer “irreparable and sustainable” mental harm. (read more here)

Those 11 cases originated in medical files that had been acquired by then-Kansas Attorney General, Phill Kline. Kline had obtained the records in an attempt (thwarted under then-Gov. Kathleen Sebelius and the state Supreme Court) to prosecute the late George Tiller for abusing the law on exceptions to the Kansas ban on post-viability abortions.

Judge Theis ruled, “there is not sufficient proof to support the board’s findings of ‘professional incompetency’…based on Neuhaus’ failure to maintain adequate records to support the diagnosis.” Instead, he

opined that the Board had, in essence, ‘over-punished’ Neuhaus for “being sloppy,” taking “short cuts,” and showing “inconsistent attention to proper protocols.”

Excuse me, Judge, but not being able to find evidence of the nature of the patient’s problems from Neuhaus’ own scanty notations and checkbox-formatted computer printouts IS the point!

The administrative court opinion (upholding the Board’s complaint) ruled there was no evidence “of any examination nor…of what transpired between the patient and licensee [Neuhaus].” Yet this was supposedly a ‘referral’ by a second, so-called independent, doctor that an abortion was the recommended solution to an irreversible mental health problem.

Obviously, the Board believes it more than ‘made its case’ and will not ‘rethink’ its sanction. In a quickly convened, 22-minute meeting conducted by phone Friday evening (with discussion by the members closed to the public), the Board chose to get Theis’ ruling voided through an appeal to the state court of appeals.

Frankly, the corrupt, past Healing Arts Board Executive Director, Larry Buening, is squarely to blame for Neuhaus, and enabling the illegal abortions of thousands of viable unborn children.

According to 2009 court testimony, Buening helped Wichita abortionist Tiller find a Kansas licensed doctor willing to ‘rubber stamp’ post-viability abortions as being authorized under a mental health exemption. Buening recommended Neuhaus, and helped steer the Board to allow her to keep her license after she had lost federal drug privileges and been found repeatedly unable to properly evaluate, examine, monitor and discharge patients.

But this well-documented pattern of Neuhaus’ inability to do the bare essentials of medical intake was downplayed by Theis. Other errors in this wrong-headed ruling will be further examined in an upcoming post.

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